Past Roundtables

2018 Roundtable: "Race, Racism, and Catholic Social Teaching"

On April 16, 2018, The Center for Civil and Human Rights continued its annual series of closed-door roundtable discussions aimed at probing key human and civil rights issues. Bringing an interdisciplinary group of scholars from the Notre Dame community into conversation with those from across the country, the 2018 roundtable focused on race and racism, exploring responses and challenges presented by Catholic Social Teaching.

"Race, Racism, and Catholic Social Teaching" was structured as a series of reflections on the Church and the academy, their relationship to historical racial inequities, and their potential for improving social justice into the future. Both the opportunities presented by CST in fighting racism, and the challenges it faces in doing so, were explored in frank discussions throughout the morning. Turning to the academy, the assembled group sought innovative ways in which institutions of higher learning might leverage their particular strengths to fight the social injustices brought about by racism.

Following the conversation, roundtable participant George Murry, Bishop of the Diocese of Youngstown, delivered a public talk entitled “The Church as a Consistent Voice Against Racism.” Informed by his work as Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism, Bishop Murry laid out an ambitious set of goals for the Catholic Church as an agent for changing racial attitudes. The address may be viewed in its entirety here.


Participating in the 2018 CCHR Roundtable were:

Christine Cervenak, Concurrent Assistant Professor of Law and Associate Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Maria Teresa Dávila, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics, Andover Newton Theological School
Darren Davis, Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame
Diane Desierto, Associate Professor of Human Rights Law and Global Affairs, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame
David Hooker, Associate Professor of the Practice of Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding, Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame
Rev. David Jones, Pastor, St. Benedict the African – East, Chicago, Illinois
Jennifer Mason McAward, Associate Professor of Law and Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Maria McKenna, Associate Professor of the Practice, Department of Africana Studies, University of Notre Dame
Karrah Miller, Director for Public Affairs, University of Notre Dame (formerly Director, Office of Institutional Equity & Title IX Coordinator, University of Notre Dame)
The Most Reverend George Murry, Bishop of the Diocese of Youngstown (OH) and Chairman, Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops
Sean O’Brien, Concurrent Associate Professor of Law and Assistant Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Margaret Pfeil, Associate Professional Specialist, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame
Bill Purcell, Associate Director, Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns; Operations and Catholic Social Tradition Director
Rev. Pat Reidy, C.S.C., Student Affairs, University of Notre Dame
Veronica Root, Associate Professor of Law, Notre Dame Law School
Vincent Rougeau, Dean, Boston College Law School
Rev. Kevin Sandberg, C.S.C., Executive Director, Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns
Susan Sharpe, Restorative Justice Advisor, Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns
Stephen Smith, Professor of Law, Notre Dame Law School

 


2017 Roundtable: "Human Rights and Catholic Social Teaching"

The Center for Civil and Human Rights has instituted a new series of closed-door roundtable discussions, probing key issues with invited scholars from Notre Dame and across the country. The series aims to place Notre Dame at the center of meaningful conversation about the most pressing civil and human rights issues facing contemporary society. A primary goal of the roundtable discussions is the establishment of jumping-off points for future research initiatives at CCHR.


The inaugural event, held on April 21, 2017 at Notre Dame Law School, focused on the intersection of the Catholic social teaching and human rights discourses. Drawing from the perspectives of both legal scholars and those deeply immersed in the CST tradition, the half-day conversation was structured to encourage an open dialogue on points of agreement and contention. Among the topics addressed by the group were the various differences between the two traditions, and ways in which each might enrich the other; potential challenges to communication between the Catholic community and those in the human rights community; and the concept of integral human development as understood and expressed by both traditions.


Attending the April roundtable were:


Evelyn Aswad, University of Oklahoma College of Law
Paolo Carozza, Notre Dame Law School/Director, Kellogg Institute for International Studies
Doug Cassel, Notre Dame Law School
Chris Cervenak, Associate Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Rachana Chhin, LL.M. candidate in International Human Rights Law, Notre Dame Law School
Meghan Clark, St. John’s University
Colleen Cross, Ph.D. candidate in Theology/Peace Studies
Christina Leblang, “Convocate” Project Manager, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Andres Lopez, J.S.D. candidate in International Human Rights Law, Notre Dame Law School
Fr. Thomas Massaro, S.J., Santa Clara University Jesuit School of Theology
Jennifer Mason McAward, Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Caesar Montevecchio, Catholic Peacebuilding Network
Sean O'Brien, Assistant Director, The Center for Civil and Human Rights
Jerry Powers, Director, Catholic Peacebuilding Studies
Bill Purcell, Associate Director, Catholic Social Tradition and Practice, Center for Social Concerns
Clemens Sedmak, King’s College, Visiting Professor, Catholic Social Tradition and Community Engagement


The inaugural roundtable coincided with the public launch of Convocate, a new online research platform developed by CCHR, in partnership with the Hesburgh Libraries, thatenables the simultaneous exploration of documents from CST and international human rights.